Latest 3D Animation Model of the Vedic Planetarium Temple

20,876 Views / EMail This Post / Print This Post / Home » Latest 3D Animation Model of the Vedic Planetarium Temple

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

To see it better click on the full-screen button of the player.

Please click the "Like" button below if you haven't done so already!
 
 
 
20,876 Views / EMail This Post / Print This Post / Home » Latest 3D Animation Model of the Vedic Planetarium Temple
 


Comments • [comment feed]

1 Unregistered

Haribol,

Please Accept My Humble Obeisences.

All Glories to Srila Prabhupada.

Very interesting and inspiring. I am in the process of building couple of temple models in
a virtual world called SecondLife, www.secondlife.com. It is a 3d world viewer wherein
a user can create an entire world virtually.

Can i request u to give me some details in the future which will help in replicating this work in SecondLife for all the vaishnavs to see.

Regards

Bhakta Kannan

Comment posted by kannanrs on March 25th, 2008
2 Unregistered

bhakta kannan prabhu, dandavats.

reading that you are active in secondlinfe got my attention: i was planning to research more into this whole phenomenon, after reading that christians and other religions have representations in this virtual world. some christians, apparently, take this quite serious and are out to preach to people “living” in second life, never mind it’s only some virtual representation.

at present i’m not sure i like the idea, or would recommend for devotees to get involved there - simply because my slow internet connection didn’t allow me to participate or even see this type of thing.

would be nice if you could get in touch with me (phani@namahatta.org), if you have any interest talking about your experience there.

your servant, phanisvara das

Comment posted by phani on March 25th, 2008
3 Akruranatha

I am glad to see progress being made on this important project that was directly requested by Srila Prabhupada. It will attract a lot of visitors and will increase the fame of Lord Caitanya’s message.

I have to admit though, I have misgivings about this particular design. (I have seen more beautiful designs over the years). I am no expert on architecture. We have so many talented artists in ISKCON with finely developed senses of style and taste. I would love to hear their reactions, as well as those of professional architects and critics.

Mayapur is something like ISKCON’s Vatican City or Mecca, the spiritual headquarters to which all devotees look, the place from which Lord Caitanya’s mercy is radiating out and saving the world. Our public architecture in such a place should be exceedingly beautiful, something that all devotees will cherish within their hearts.

It should be something admired by nondevotees, too, the way many cathedrals of Europe attract millions of appreciative visitors each year, regardless of their religious backgrounds.

The huge scale of the proposed building is grand and impressive, which I suppose will attract lots of attention, but grandeur in architecture can have its risks. Unless there is sufficient grace and unity in the design, grand buildings can produce a crass or vulgar effect. (There is also a separate issue of local environmental impact.)

Eclecticism can be good. It is wonderful when (as with the Taj Mahal) elements from diverse styles come together to produce a wonderful new, coherent statement. However, there is something “busy” about the many styles in this design which do not seem to really coalesce.

I hate to say it, but there is something about the big, loud, unrefined, unharmonious eclecticism here that reminds me of theme parks, or the excesses of Miami Beach and Las Vegas kitschy hotels. I would like to see more genuine, understated beauty.

At least to my subjective taste there seems to be something garish and artificial about this design, like an overblown Hollywood production. I wonder what true connoisseurs of architecture have to say about it.

I know a lot of devotees have put their hearts and souls into this important project for many years, and I do not want to disparage anyone’s service or hurt anyone’s feelings. However, when ISKCON builds something so big and permanent, it is a real defining moment, so I felt I should not remain silent.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on March 26th, 2008
4 Akruranatha

Specific comments:

The I.M. Pei - style glass pyramid could be nice. The reference to ancient Egypt (another great, ancient culture with its own cosmology), along with the geometric simplicity and clean classic lines of the pyramid, juxtaposed with its ultra-modern execution in glass (what will be housed in the pyramid, anyway?), help accentuate the “oldest of all, but in new dress” theme. My main gripe is, since Pei originally did this at the Louvre in Paris, it has now been repeated in many different venues. It lacks originality and seems like a rip-off. It also makes the Garuda stambha reminiscent of an Egyptian obelisque, and adds to the sense of over-eclecticism without a strong, unifying aesthetic theme.

The use of the cover-design paintings for the First Canto Bhagavatam is a great idea. I think there are ISKCON temples (e.g. in Peru?) that use this illustration very effectively on the inside of domes. However, in this design it is not well executed. The painting does not lend itself to the tall, narrow shape of the Mughal-style towers or campaniles on which it is painted. It seems odd to have this same painting reproduced so many times, on each side of each of the eight towers: this creates a jarring impression of many Golokas, many mahat-tattvas. Also, the colors just seem to clash with the green marble columns of the towers. The whole impression is lacking in simplicity, grace or harmony. One big Bhagavatam painting somewhere would be nice, but so many tall, narrow ones side by side on all these multi-colored towers is aesthetically disconcerting.

Something about shape and arrangement of the big, wedding cake domes and their gold cupolas reminds me of political buildings like the U.S. Capitol or San Francisco’s City Hall, both beautiful buildings, but projecting more of an air of earthly political power than majestic divine harmony. I suppose I could get used to it, but it is not love at first sight for me.

And what are the figures on the outside of the domes? Are they statues of devotees like the ones on the Samadhi? I cannot quite make them out in the video, but I hope that is not what they are.

In all this jumble of different styles, the elephant-based columns seem out of place, as do other ancient Indian (pre-Muslim) touches. They seem more like an artificially imposed theme or motif than a genuine part of the architect’s vision.

As for environmental impact, I am sure it has been carefully considered, but …

Comment posted by Akruranatha on March 26th, 2008
5 Akruranatha

Regarding environmental impact, I know the devotees have been carefully considering this, and I am sure there has been some government oversight as well.

The video with its vision of big boats docking at the big concrete quays on the Ganga is a little scary, though. (Is this just a feature of the computer program? Or is there really a plan to have so many big boats?)

I suppose Mayapur will eventually beome a big, modern city with the attendent cars, ships and related air and water pollution, traffic congestion and other modern problems. I suppose this will be necessary as the world’s attention turns to Mayapur as the spiritual capital of Gaudiya Vaisnavism. It is just a little frightening to see it depicted in this 3-D video, and my mind starts reeling.

This giant building will require a lot of maintenance, and the growing project and destination of millions of visitors will require careful urban planning. It would be nice to see Mayapur as a leader in state-of-the-art green solutions to some of the problems of modern urban development.

I am just afraid if caution is not taken it could become a sprawling nightmare of traffic jams, big deisel boats, crowds and litter, totally out of step with the development of the local surrounding villages and their simple agrarian economy.

I am sorry to be so negative. I know everything is under the complete control of Lord Caitanya and that intelligent devotees are working hard to carry out Srila Prabhupada’s orders and make his vision a reality. I do not want to be a nay-sayer, and I am supportive of this great project. These were just some immediate, honest reactions I had to viewing this 3-D video model.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on March 26th, 2008
6 Suresh das

I noticed that too, regarding the auto traffic, parking lots, and the large cruise boats docked nearby. Is Mayapur projected to be a bussling city in the near future?

Comment posted by Suresh das on March 27th, 2008
7 Braja Sevaki

Akruranatha prabhu wrote: “Something about shape and arrangement of the big, wedding cake domes and their gold cupolas reminds me of political buildings like the U.S. Capitol or San Francisco’s City Hall, both beautiful buildings, but projecting more of an air of earthly political power than majestic divine harmony. I suppose I could get used to it, but it is not love at first sight for me.”

In researching the desires expressed by Srila Prabhupada for the Temple of the Vedic Planetarium, several sources were found where he specifically referred to a dome shape, and more specifically the US Capitol building, as you mention, and the Victoria Memorial in Calcutta, and in fact there are many aspects of this particular design that are more in line with Srila Prabhupada’s desires than previous designs.

your servant
Braja Sevaki dd
Mayapur

Comment posted by Braja Sevaki on March 28th, 2008
8 Radha Mohan das UK

Akruranatha prabhu has made alot of very relevant points and I agree with many of them. Therefore, there is no need for them to be repeated. One factor however is really worth enthasising- - the Mayapur Project has to realistically consider its physical, social and environmental impact on surrouding villages, the town of Navadvip and the river. What of security?

That said, the presentation, namely the computer graphics and the overall design itself is impressive. Its a shame that the computer program does not seem to be able to have rickshaw wallas, ISKCON devotees and sadhus built into its system! Instead we see characters that look like they would be more at home in New York! Never mind.

The dome idea is fine. It is true that there are many domed structures in western cities, whether they are in Washingon, London or Paris or Moscow, but that in itself is not a disqualification because they were built with great care and precision. Another good thing about the dome is that it fits in with the Planetarium image.

I am curious about the internal design of the building and how it will become a Planetarium in the real sense.

I am looking forward to seeing more…

Comment posted by Radha Mohan das UK on March 28th, 2008
9 Unregistered

Haribol

I think that the singer is Bada Hari Dasa Prabhu. Is it so? Or is it someone else?

Hare Krishna
Ashwin

Comment posted by ashwin108 on March 29th, 2008
10 Unregistered

One more note is that the elephants’ cloths have names on them - the first one is for Gulab Kali, but I couldn’t figure out who was on the other cloth.

Comment posted by ashwin108 on March 29th, 2008
11 Unregistered

Ashwin 108 wrote: ‘I think that the singer is Bada Hari Dasa Prabhu. Is it so?”

That is correct.

I wonder if anyone can provide a link for downloading that particular bhajan (”Keno Hare Krsna Nama”) sung by him?

Comment posted by gkd on March 31st, 2008
12 Unregistered

I hope the new Temple will have solar batteries incorporated in the design for it’s electrical supply…

Comment posted by rambalaram on April 1st, 2008
13 Akruranatha

Here is a picture of the Victoria Memorial. It is undoubtedly a beautiful building.

I did not mean to disparage the concept of a dome (it was always my understanding that the planetarium will be housed inside a dome, with different levels of material and spiritual planetary systems).

Obviously, domes are widely used in sacred architecture. Many world-renowned cathedrals in Italy (e. g., in Florence, Milan, etc.) are popularly just called “Il Duomo” (the Dome). But as Radha Mohan pointed out, some domes are more beautiful than others.

Rereading my earlier comments, I may have indulged in stronger than necessary language. I am no expert. What do I know? I certainly would not want to hold back progress on this long overdue project, and I am sure that many great minds have been involved in the planning and design.

My main thrust is that I really would like to see what the accomplished artists and architects have to say about this design. What architects are involved? [Whatever happened to Surabhi Prabhu? Is he still around?] Have we solicited comments from experts in the field?

Of course, in matters of taste we might expect some differences of opinion, even among professional architects, especially regarding some daring or innovative work. But then again, there really are true standards of beauty and quality, and some buildings are almost universally admired or panned by the critics.

I hope whatever we do will win the approval and admiration of at least a significant percentage of those who have training and a developed sense of what makes a sacred building beautiful and well-designed.

Ideally, tourist guide books for people visiting India will rave about the beautiful architecture of ISKCON’s Mayapur temple, and say it is a must stop on everyone’s sightseeing trip, where the visitor can also stay and get knowledge about India’s ancient Vedic traditions and the bhakti cult of the Hare Krishnas, located at their headquarters, the birth place of Sri Krishna Caitanya, one of the world’s important religious figures, etc. That would be a real “home run” if we could pull it off. (Okay so I like to dream a little). :-)

Of course the goal is to make a building that pleases Prabhupada, and the design must take into account all of his instructions on the subject. It just seems to me that Prabhupada would want us to make it as beautiful and well-respected as possible, to design it in such a way that its form inspires people and attracts favorable comments from the general public and also from the arbiters of taste and style and “high culture”.

Not that we need to be slaves to fashion. Certainly not. But ISKCON should be a leader in matters of art, music, culture. The world’s cultural leaders should recognize it as such. I was just afraid, upon seeing this design, that maybe we could do better. I am curious what others think.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on April 1st, 2008
14 Kulapavana

I find it curious that this presentation does not show a single picture of the Vedic Planetarium exhibit, the very central reason this temple is proposed. Buildings are nice, the world is full of impressive architecture, but what about the contents?

I understand that the research of the Vedic vision of the Universe is still continuing but it would be nice to see what type of presentation can we expect. It would also be helpful to see where the current ISKCON research stands in terms of answering the most basic and immediate questions about the Universe, such as linear distances between Earth, Sun, and Moon.

Comment posted by Kulapavana on April 2nd, 2008
15 Unregistered

Impressive – but is it the right building? (part one)

The new 3D model of the proposed temple is impressive, but like Akruranatha I have strong reservations about the approach. I cannot deny it closely matches the original idea expressed by Srila Prabhupada in 1971. This is in part our dilemma: do we unquestioningly execute the details of his directions, even though time and place may have moved on in the intervening years? Or do we try to express their spirit? To what extent do we rely on our experience and acquired knowledge, bearing in mind what we are talking of here is architecture, not eternal truths. I admit these are difficult questions.

Personally I find the monumental scale and international derivation of this design in conflict with its purpose. It is out to impress but has little sympathy with the gentle landscape of Nadia or the culture we all surely aspire to. To my eyes, attuned to the great religious architecture of east and west, it is a crude and secular design more akin to ancient Rome than twentieth-century Bengal.

I am told that Prabhupada indicated the design of the Capitol in Washington DC as a model. He similarly indicated the design of Westminster Abbey when he was in London – two very different buildings. I think these indications are not to be taken too literally, because they varied so much and were in such different contexts – London 1971 and Washington 1975. It is worth noting that both these buildings arose from a long evolution of ideas and were not overnight creations. The Capitol building was the culmination of over a hundred years of developing Washington as a national capital city for America. Its design grew out of the designs for state buildings all over America, as well as Paris and London. It was also the product of all the might and wealth that America could muster at the start of the twentieth century. Religious buildings like Westminster Abbey typically have even longer gestation periods, measured in centuries rather than decades.

The present collection of buildings at Mayapur are a credit to the devotees, most without professional training, who for 36 years laboured to build them – I am in awe of their dedication. But in terms of architectural merit these buildings are an elementary and confused beginning on a long journey. In my view we are simply not ready to produce what aspires to be one of the world’s great buildings.

So what is to be done? (continued in part two

Comment posted by Ranchor das on April 2nd, 2008
16 Unregistered

Impressive – but is it the right building? (part two)

So what is to be done? I think the project should be approached in modest phases, starting on a small scale to develop an architectural and visual language that expresses the underlying culture of Chaitanya Vaishnavism, producing sustainable buildings of quality, environmentally sensitive, on a human scale, in varied forms. From this we may evolve a mature style or collection of styles that are true to our beliefs. Some progress has already been made on this path.

My other grave concern is to do with the environment of Mayapur. The site is hazardous because of erosion and regular flooding. It is also in a region that is economically and politically sensitive. There are major cultural questions to do with what happens when you impose a wealthy but isolated community of foreigners into an economically undeveloped and socially disempowered rural setting, with a possibly hostile political establishment.

Good architecture should be sensitive to its context. A building of lasting merit is one that so well expresses its underlying values that it inspires the affection and admiration of those who live alongside it as well as those who visit it for generations to come. Not an easy remit, and one that experience shows takes many generations to emerge from any religious tradition, no matter how glorious.

I will close with a true story. A few years ago in Calcutta I told an educated Bengali man that I would be visiting Mayapur, and described the magnificent concrete dome of Prabhupada’s Samadhi. “This is your culture,” I said to him. “Oh this is not my culture,” he assured me, and showed me a postcard of Santiniketan, the ashram and college campus founded by Rabindranath Tagore not far from Mayapur. The architecture of Shantiniketan is low-impact, small-scale, varied, organic, using sustainable materials, and environmentally sensitive. “This is my culture,” he told me.

It is my culture too.

Comment posted by Ranchor das on April 2nd, 2008
17 Akruranatha

Haribol Ranchor Prabhu:

Dandavats! All glories to Srila Prabhupada.

Are you Ranchor Prime, the author? I can only guess you must be, because you write so eloquently and are so sensitive and thoughtful about environmental issues.

You raise a lot of great points. Radha Mohan also expressed concern about security. Do we want to build a giant terrorist target? I have been reluctant to even discuss that question.

On the other side of the coin, it does seem clear that Srila Prabhupada wanted something huge and magnificent. He surely knew about Santiniketan, but he spoke of the Victoria Monument, the U.S. Capitol and Westminster Abbey. The idea, as I understand it, was that the time has come for Lord Caitanya’s movement to adopt the means and methods of the wealthy and powerful cultures of the world, to create a new “Caitanya culture”, which will become very prominent and influential everywhere.

In 1922 Prabhupada asked, “Who will listen to Caitanya’s message while we are still a dependent country?” Srila Bhaktisiddhanta convinced Srila Prabhupada that preaching did not have to wait for political independence, but it was still a good question, demonstrating Prabhupada’s mood that the world needs to sit up and take notice of Lord Caitanya.

>>do we unquestioningly execute the details of his directions, even though time and place may have moved on in the intervening years? Or do we try to express their spirit? To what extent do we rely on our experience and acquired knowledge, bearing in mind what we are talking of here is architecture, not eternal truths. I admit these are difficult questions.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on April 3rd, 2008
18 Akruranatha

>>do we unquestioningly execute the details of his directions, even though time and place may have moved on in the intervening years? Or do we try to express their spirit? . . .

Comment posted by Akruranatha on April 4th, 2008
19 Akruranatha

I remember one famous “Prabhupada said” story about the Mayapur project, which I think is authentic. (Our folio-wallas might look it up).

Prabhupada was reportedly sitting with devotees in one of the first buildings on the ISKCON Mayapur property, with a thatched roof and a dirt floor (maybe down by the gate where the small Gaura-Nitai temple is?)

He told the devotees basically (I hope I am not getting it too wrong) that this kind of building is in the mode of goodness and if it was just for us we would be content to stay in buildings like this and do our hearing and chanting and worshiping. However, for the sake of preaching, we are going to build a huge temple here, because that will attract the (rajasic) people in general to come and pay attention.

I wish I had the exact quote because I probably have done a fair amount of editorializing in trying to tell the story.

Another time Srila Prabhupada said, “If you can’t do something wonderful, what is the use of your being Americans?”

My take on all this is that part of the “spirit” of Srila Prabhupada’s instructions was that he wants the wealthy and powerful countries of the world to employ their resources and know-how for preaching Lord Caitanya’s message, to make a big impact.

Hare Krishna may already be a household word, but we won’t stop there. Prabhupada now wants the principle of “yukta vairagya” to be used to make huge propaganda for Krishna consciousness everywhere. There should be courses in Srimad Bhagavatam and Caitanya Caritamrta at western universities, taught by faithful devotees. Presidents and prime ministers should chant Hare Krishna and study Bhagavad Gita As It Is.

Building a huge, opulent Planetarium Temple in Mayapur is part of that propaganda effort, I think. But Prabhupada wants us to do it with taste and flair and due concern for the environmental issues raised by Ranchor and Radha Mohan, too. We need to be recognized as experts and leaders and first-class intelligent people, who do everything very nicely for Krishna.

If I sound inconsistent and mixed up, maybe I really am. I do believe ISKCON can build a grand-scale Temple of the Vedic Planetarium that will become a major world attraction and will be admired by world critics and will help bring prosperity and harmony to all the local villages.

But I am naive and optimistic by nature, people say, and I do not really know how to do all this or how it will happen.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on April 4th, 2008
20 Unregistered

Ranchor wrote:

I will close with a true story. A few years ago in Calcutta I told an educated Bengali man that I would be visiting Mayapur, and described the magnificent concrete dome of Prabhupada’s Samadhi. “This is your culture,” I said to him. “Oh this is not my culture,” he assured me, and showed me a postcard of Santiniketan, the ashram and college campus founded by Rabindranath Tagore not far from Mayapur. The architecture of Shantiniketan is low-impact, small-scale, varied, organic, using sustainable materials, and environmentally sensitive. “This is my culture,” he told me.

It is my culture too.

Dear Ranchor Prabhu,

Please accept my humble obeisance. All glories to Srila Prabhupada.

You described Santiniketan as:

the ashram and college campus

And such style as you describe eminently suits such a facility but Mayapura was envisaged by Bhaktivinode Thakura as a “golden city” not an ashram. True Mayapura does have ashramas and school campuses on it but it is much more, it is the seed of a small city.

In the Mahabharata Sabha Parva, chapters 3, 6-11 there are descriptions of many grand buildings that would dwarf our planned attempt in Mayapura. See also Krsna Book chapter 75. This is also our culture and suitable for a city.

I hope this finds you well.

Your humble servant
Ad

Comment posted by Atmavidya Dasa on April 4th, 2008
21 Braja Sevaki

Yasomati-nandana(?): One is Vivekananda. Another is Gandhi.
Prabhupada: They have spoiled India’s culture. All these… Rabindranath Tagore. All misleaders. Caitanya Mahaprabhu is the real leader, and Krishna.

Comment posted by Braja Sevaki on April 5th, 2008
22 Unregistered

I just hope Mayapur does not turn into a city. I still remember the first day I set foot in Mayapur, I love the Mayapur village.. its full of life.

Comment posted by rd1089 on April 5th, 2008
23 Unregistered

I don’t think I will like to visit a Mayapur that has a 4 lane highway running through it. Where will the pilgrims take their bath in Ganga?, on a concrete river bank?

What about the traffic, noise pollution, water pollution, etc? This is available everywhere. As more and more of the worlds populatoin comes to live in crowded cities, it may not be so attractive to go on pilgrimage to another city, with all the things that make cities an unfavorable environment for introspection and peace of mind.

The future of preaching is in creating a peaceful haven from these disturbing elements.

Comment posted by atmananda dasa on April 7th, 2008
24 Unregistered

For those who have visited Vrindavan, they will know that it is almost impossible to walk in front of the Krsna Balarama Mandir on weekends and busy periods.

Cars travel bumper to bumper, blowing their horns - there is so much of noise and chaos.

I always felt that cars should never be allowed to travel on that road. People should be made to leave their cars at the entry points of Vrndavana. There should be shuttle services from there, taking pilgrims where they want to go. Visitors should also be encouraged to walk.

Mayapur could adopt such an idea. Cars should never be allowed to come through. Instead, there could be shuttle services in the form of eco frindly busses and also rikshas for those who prefer this.

There should also be footpaths for pilgrims who want to enter with humility (like in Tirupati, pilgrims are supposed to walk up to the temple in an austere mood).

Let Mother Ganga be in her natural environment, as she knows it and let the devotees get her blessings in this natural way. Keep as much natural as possible in this project.

Comment posted by Nitai dasa on April 8th, 2008
25 Unregistered

“Yasomati-nandana(?): One is Vivekananda. Another is Gandhi.
Prabhupada: They have spoiled India’s culture. All these… Rabindranath Tagore. All misleaders. Caitanya Mahaprabhu is the real leader, and Krishna.

Comment posted by Braja Sevaki on April 5th, 2008″

This is beside the point. Ranchor Prabhu was not advocating Rabindranath Tagore’s influence on Indian culture and certainly he is advocating the influence of Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu. He has dedicated his life to this work, is it not? He was simply citing an example from his personal experience about how the local Bengali gentleman viewed the architecture of Mayapur. The point was about the architecture. The connection to Rabindranath Tagore was only incidental.

“I will close with a true story. A few years ago in Calcutta I told an educated Bengali man that I would be visiting Mayapur, and described the magnificent concrete dome of Prabhupada’s Samadhi. “This is your culture,” I said to him. “Oh this is not my culture,” he assured me, and showed me a postcard of Santiniketan, the ashram and college campus founded by Rabindranath Tagore not far from Mayapur. The architecture of Shantiniketan is low-impact, small-scale, varied, organic, using sustainable materials, and environmentally sensitive. “This is my culture,” he told me.

It is my culture too.

Comment posted by Ranchor das on April 2nd, 2008″

Comment posted by atmananda dasa on April 22nd, 2008
26 Akruranatha

Atmananda makes a very good point.

Obviously, just because we may reject Tagore, Vivekananda, M. K. Gandhi in some spheres does not mean we have to reject everything they said or did. They might have good ideas about architecture or other know how which could be employed in service to Krishna.

Tagore supported arts like poetry, music and dance. Those arts, when wielded by pure devotees, can help satisfy Krishna and purify the world.

One thing that is very prominant in Srila Prabhupada’s legacy is that he was enthusiastic about employing techniques of the dominant, wealthy, materialistic culture to make big propaganda for the pure message of Lord Caitanya. We can use the latest in technology for publishing, transportation, mass communication, etc., as long as we know how to employ these things to properly glorify Krishna.

The people of the world are all captivated by kali yuga technology. If that same technology is used nicely in devotional service, it can be spiritualized, although the pure devotees prefer simple mode of goodness modes of living.

Prabhupada wanted big, beautiful architecture in Mayapur to help attract the world’s attention to Lord Caitanya’s sankirtan movement.

He also wanted us to set an example of sustainable village life based on the principle of “simple living and high thinking.”

The vanguard of contemporary technologists and architects recognizes the dangers of pollution, overcrowding, global warming, consumption of nonrenewable resources, etc., etc. They are looking for other technical solutions to these problems [Few of them realize yet that the panacea is sankirtan yajna]

As India and China rapidly industrialize without the degree of regulation adopted by countries that industrialized earlier, the problems of pollution etc. are even more apparent.

It seems like the sankirtan movement should employ the best modern techniques to promote the maximum glorification of Krishna in a way that will attract favorable attention from world leaders and opinion makers.

If we are too small scale and low impact, no one will take notice. If we are not tasteful and elegant and sensitive to the environment, we will not make as good an impression as we should, and will contradict our own optimistic message that the world’s problems can be solved by Krishna consciousness.

The world’s urgent necessity is sankirtan yajna. We are promoting a new spiritual culture based on pleasing Krishna.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on April 23rd, 2008
27 Akruranatha

Like the singer in a famous Sam Cooke song, I “don’t know much about history”.

I really know very little about the history of art and architecture, but I have heard people say that when Alexander of Macedonia invaded part of of India, he left some people behind, and some of them became devotees (like the Hellenic-Indian king who erected the famous Heliodorus column).

They say this Hellenic period introduced new styles of sculpture and had influences on Indian architechture of the time.

What mundane art historians do not know (really, does anyone know all that much about history?) is that long before the Greeks, Krishna Himself erected Dwaraka City, and there were buildings erected in ancient India by the celestial architect Visvakarma and the Danava named Maya, buildings that we can scarcely imagine.

More importantly, whatever genius there is in artists, sculptors, architects, musical composers, is really coming from Krishna. He is the ability in man.

The time may soon come when the greatest human achievements in contemporary song, dance, poetry, philosophy, theatre, cinema, architecture and even grosser technology will all be done for the greater glory of Krishna.

To the Bengali gentleman who said Shantineketan was his culture, what could I reply? Would I show him a photo of McDonald’s and Wal Mart? :-(

Would I play him records by Sam Cooke or Elvis Presley, or Oscar Peterson or Aaron Copeland? I hate to think that is my culture (but in a way it is).

I would like to think I would have the presence of mind to show him Krishna book and Bhagavad Gita, of the beautiful Deities in ISKCON temples, and of the beautiful, merciful ISKCON sankirtan devotees from all over the world, and say this is really *my* culture. Not just my adopted culture, but the true, original, hidden culture of all jivas.

“Human society is no longer bounded by geographical limits to particular countries or communities. Human society is broader than in the Middle Ages, and the world tendency is toward one state or one human society. The ideals of spiritual communism, according to Srimad Bhagavatam, are based more or less on the oneness of the entire human society, nay, of the entire energy of living beings. The need is felt by great thinkers to make this a successful ideology. Srimad Bhagavatam will fill this need in human society.”

This is our culture. It is the culture of everyone. It is dormant in the heart, but wakens by chanting Hare Krishna.

Comment posted by Akruranatha on April 24th, 2008
28 ccd

Akruranatha Prabhu brings up quite a few important points. In fact most of the posts have a common theme, on sustainability and protection of the natural habitat. Something we associate Mayapur with. Normally its dealt by careful study of the impact and making a sustainable policy by calculating the projected impact. For example - what is the cost of maintaining the road and what impact delivery of labour and materials will have on it. What waste will be deposited in the Ganga as the result of construction? What will be the impact on the adjoining existing buildings, such as Lotus building?

Its the details of a bigger picture, but it appears that the wonderful presentation does not reflect this aspect, that becomes a key to many new developments in this century. Unfortunately architect involved, Ajan Mitra, is not proficient in this and can not brief the design team on it. Someone may argue that its not what Prabhupada wanted, a sustainable development. However Prabhupada was always practical, and in the present day, sustainable means practical, and that should be the image to project, not the image of Las Vegasy religious resort, maybe we should go a notch deeper on this one? We do not want Rabindranath Tagor showing a better example for the coming future, do we? ys Caitanya

Comment posted by ccd on April 24th, 2008
29 Tim

Hare Krishna prabhus,

When I saw the new design first I thought: ‘Oh my God, what are they doing?’ Why not a smaller version of Padasevanam’s design (the best) if that would be too big and expensive to build?

But, in time, I figured the devotees working on it have their reasons, so I looked at the new design again. Well, it is majestic and nice. When the Eiffel Tower in Paris was built first everyone was complaining , but now it’s the main attraction there. Of course, this new design is a lot nicer than the Eiffel Tower! And regarding the argument that it looks too Western - as we can see the design concept is similar to what we are familiar with ancient Greek and Roman buildings. But we know where the Greeks and Romans got their ideas from - do we not?!

The principle activity in the building will be harinam sankirtan and pure devotion to Krishna. So it will be a living and exciting place that the building itself will only be existing to house. There is an impressive (the building, that is) Vedic temple of the Swami Narayana Mission in London. But when I went there once I saw a lot of stone, for I felt the life and purity of ISKCON wasn’t there. So our new temple in Mayapur will be different, because of Lord Chaitanya, Srila Prabhupada and the devotees.

Comment posted by Tim on August 1st, 2008

Comments are closed. Please check back later.

 
 
Home » Latest 3D Animation Model of the Vedic Planetarium Temple
 
  • Post Details

Author: Administrator Administrator's website Administrator's email
Post Date: Monday, March 24th, 2008
Categories: News
Trackback: Trackback
 
  • Last update: Wed October 1

  • Who is online

    • 35 currently online
    • 170 maximum concurrent
    • 12230789 total visitors

    Registered users online

  • Registered users: 6407

  • Navigation

  • -OTHER INCOMING LINKS
  • BC VTE Bhakti Sastri Online
  • Bhaktimarga Swami's blog
  • Bhaktivedanta Book Trust
  • Bhaktivedanta College
  • Bhaktivedanta Institute (Alachua)
  • Bhaktivedanta Manor
  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase Network
  • Bhaktivedanta Vedabase Online
  • Cooking with Kurma
  • Darshan of SS Radha-Londonisvara
  • Dharmapatnis
  • Diary of a Traveling Preacher
  • Euro GBC
  • Forbidden Archeology
  • Gaudiya Vaisnava texts
  • Indradyumna Swami Media
  • ISKCON Bangalore Official
  • ISKCON Deity Worship Ministry
  • ISKCON Health & Welfare Ministry
  • ISKCON Ministry of Educational Development
  • ISKCON's Congregational Development Ministry
  • Iskcon-desire-tree
  • Iskcon.com
  • Jayadvaita Swami's personal site
  • Krishna Dharma's website
  • Krishna Lila Entertainment
  • Krishna.com
  • Krishnamarriage.com
  • matchlessgifts.org
  • Mayapur Academy
  • Mayapur Days
  • Mayapur International School
  • Ministry of Educational Development
  • Our Spiritual Journey
  • Parisisvara
  • prabhupadavani.org
  • Radio Krsna Central
  • Saligrama Sila site
  • Sridham Mayapura
  • The Bhaktivedanta Archives
  • The ISKCON Sannyasa Ministry
  • The Official GBC site
  • The official website of Radhanatha Swami
  • Trivikrama Swami
  • Vaisnava Calendar
  • Vaisnava Calendar Reminder
  • Vaisnava care website
  • Vanipedia
  • varnashrama.org
  • Vedic Astrologer
  • Vedic knowledge online
  • Vedic view on controversial issues
  • Website in Bengali language
  • Yadunandana Swami's personal site
  • Alachua Temple Live Podcast
  • Comments by author
  • Donate through searching
  • Founder Acarya
  • Incoming Links
  • Iskcon News TV Channel
  • Iskcon Radio stations
  • Iskcon Universe Feed
  • Jaya Srila Prabhupada!
  • Krishna conscious "youtube"
  • Krishna Conscious Media
  • Most commented articles
  • Most read articles
  • New Dwaraka Archived Lectures
  • Polls
  • Stats
  • Temple webcams
  • Thanks!
  • The last seven day's most read articles
  • Mayor of Jandelsbrun, Germany, visits and addresses Farm conference
  • From Zonal-Acarya To Buffer-Zone
  • Festival of Kirtana - Sep 2014
  • Prabhupada Now book
  • Bhaktivedanta Manor Introductory Course for Women, UK
  • Detroit ISKCON Celebrates Pushpa Abhishek Festival
  • Preaching in South Korea
  • We are all Hare Krishnas now, meditation goes mainstream
  • WSN August 2014 - World Sankirtan Newsletter
  • New book publication from the Bhaktivedanta Academy: Defeating Vatsasura

     
    "Artwork and photos courtesy of the Bhaktivedanta Book Trust International, Inc. www.krishna.com. Used with permission"