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His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

Founder-Acarya of International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)

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The Extraordinary Biography of
His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

He built a house in which the whole world can live

His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada (1896-1977) was sent by the Lord Krishna to fulfil Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu's prediction “Prtvithe ache yata nagaradi grama, sarvatra pracara haibe more nama” - In every town and village of the world, My name will be heard. Srila Bhaktivinoda Thakura wrote in his Sajjona-tosani, "Soon there will be a time when the chanting of Krishna's name will be heard in England, France, Russia, Germany and America." Srila Prabhupada is widely regarded as the world’s pre-eminent exponent of the teachings and practices of Bhakti-yoga to the Western world. He is a Gaudiya Vaishnava spiritual teacher and the Founder-acarya of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), commonly known as the "Hare Krishna Movement”.

·         Early life: He appeared as Abhay Charan De on September 1, in 1896, in Calcutta, a day after Sri Krishna Janmastami. His father was Gour Mohan De, a cloth merchant, and his mother was Rajani. Gour Mohan was a pure Vaisnava, and he raised his son to be Krishna conscious. Every morning before breakfast, the family members would visit the temple to see the Deity of Radha-Govinda. Gour Mohan wanted Vaisnava goals for his son; he wanted Abbay to become a servant of Sri Sri Radha and Krishna, to become a preacher of the Bhagavatam and to learn the devotional art of playing the mrdanga drum. He regularly received sadhus in his home, and he would always ask them, "Please bless my son that Srimati Radharani will grant him Her blessings." Abbay was also enamoured with the Rathayatra festival of Lord Jagannatha. With the help of his father, he built a Rathayatra cart and had Rathayatra festival with his friends. During Abhay's college years, his father arranged for his marriage, selecting Radharani Datta. Abbay was especially interested in Mohandas K. Gandhi.

·         Meeting with Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati: In 1922 Abhay had the first meeting with his spiritual master, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, a prominent religious scholar and the founder of sixty-four Gaudiya Mathas (Vedic institutes). At first Abbay didn't want to meet him, having been unimpressed by the so-called sadhus who used to visit his father's house. But a friend of Abhay's had insisted, escorting him to the quarters of the Gaudiya Math, where they were brought him in the presence of Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati. No sooner did Abbay and his friend respectfully bow before the saintly person and prepare to sit than he said to them, "You are educated young men. Why don't you preach Lord Caitanya's message throughout the whole world?" Abbay was very surprised that the sadhu had immediately asked them to become preachers on his behalf. Impressed by Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati, he wanted to test him with intelligent inquiries. Abbay proclaimed one to be a supporter of Gandhi's cause for political emancipation. In the spirit of Indian nationalism, therefore, Abbay inquired, "Who will hear your Caitanya's message? We are a dependent country. First India must become independent. How can we spread India's culture if we are under British rule?"

·         Srila Bhaktisiddhanta replied that Krishna consciousness didn't have to wait for a change in Indian politics, nor was it dependent on who ruled. Krishna consciousness was so important that it could not wait. All governments were temporary; the eternal reality was Krishna consciousness, and the real self was the spirit soul. No man-made political system could help humanity. This was the verdict of the Vedic scriptures and the line of spiritual masters. Real public welfare work, he said, should go beyond concerns of the temporary and prepare a person for his next life and his eternal relationship with the Supreme. Abhay concluded that this was certainly not dubious sadhu. He listened attentively to the arguments become convinced. That very night he had actually accepted Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati as his spiritual master. "Not officially," Prabhupada said, "but in my heart. I was thinking that I had met a very nice saintly person."

·         In 1932, Abhay received initiation from Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura. Abhay's family responsibilities and his preaching, however, seemed to conflict. His wife was religious at home, but didn't like the idea to spread Krishna consciousness. When Abbay attempted to hold gatherings in their home and speak from Bhagavad-Gita, she preferred to stay upstairs drinking tea. Still, despite her obstinacy, Abbay remained patient and tried to include her.

·         Srila Bhaktisiddhanta departed from the mortal world in Dec 1936. One month before his departure, Abhay wrote him a letter. He was thinking that as a grhastha he couldn't fully serve his spiritual master, and he wanted to know what more he could do. Thus he inquired, "Is there any particular service I can do?" Two weeks later Abhay received a reply: "I am fully confident that you can explain in English our thoughts and arguments to the people who are not conversant with the languages [Bengali and Hindi]… This will do much good to yourself as well as your audience. I have every hope that you can turn yourself into a very good English preacher." Abhay at once recognized this to be the same instruction he had received at his first meeting with Srila Bhaktisiddhanta, in 1922. He took it as a confirmation. He now had no doubt as to the purpose of his life.

·         In 1940s large national and international events continued including World War II and in 1947 India gained her long-sought independence from Britain. But the national happiness was soon followed by horror as hundreds of thousands died in the fighting that followed the partition of the nation into India and Pakistan. Abbay was not hopeful about promises for peace, nor did he consider Indian independence the solution. Unless the leaders were God conscious, what change would there be? In Back to Godhead, in his article "Gandhi-Jinnah Talks," he wrote, "Fighting will go on between Hindu and Mohammedan, between Christians and Christians, between Buddhist and Buddhist till the day of annihilation." His point: “As long as people are possessed of selfish interests and desires for sense gratification, they will continue fighting. Real unity was possible only on the platform of spiritual understanding and service to the Supreme.” Recognizing Abhay’s philosophical learning and devotion, the Gaudiya Vaisnava Society honored him in 1947 with the title "Bhaktivedanta."

·         Struggling alone: With great difficulty, even when Abbay was unable to raise enough money to publish regular issues of Back to Godhead magazine, he continued writing. He wrote to many leaders in government. Presenting himself as a humble servant, he would explain his ideas on how to apply India's original Krishna conscious culture as the successful solution to all manner of dilemmas.

·         At Jhansi: Once a hospital customer in the city of Jhansi invited Abbay to lecture at the Gita Mandir. His lecture was well received. Leaving his Allahabad business affairs in the hands of his son, he tried to create a spiritual movement in Jhansi. Abbay was 56, and he thought that he must now begin very seriously manifesting the orders of his spiritual master. Since his spiritual master's institution, the Gaudiya Math, had become ineffectual due to fights and permanent factions, he attempted to start a movement of devotees with worldwide activities. In 1954 he wrote a charter and legally registered his movement as the "League of Devotees": "Wanted-candidates from any nationality to qualify themselves as real Brahmins for preaching the teachings of Bhagwat Geeta for all practical purposes throughout the whole world. Deserving candidates will be provided with free boarding and lodging. Apply: A.C. Bhaktivedanta, Founder and Secretary of the League of Devotees, Bharati Bhawan, P.O. Jhansi (U.P.)" -Abhay Charan De. At Jhansi he had to leave his building when the governor's wife insisted that it be used for a ladies' club instead of the League of Devotees. Without a place to stay and with no real support, he left Jhansi to New Delhi.

·         New Delhi - Crying Alone in Wilderness: The 1950s proved very difficult years for Abbay. In Delhi he spent his time writing and approaching donors, to whom he preached Bhagavad-Gita. He was calling on wealthy men, presenting his manuscripts and explaining his mission. But few responded. Eventually, however, he collected enough to again print Back to Godhead magazine. Lacking money to buy even proper clothes, Abbay went through the chilly Delhi winter without a jacket. He would regularly walk to the printer's to read the latest proofs of Back to Godhead. When the printer asked him why he was intent on producing his newspaper under such hardships, he replied, "It is my mission." He managed to pay the printer small amounts at intervals. After picking up the copies from the printer, Abhay would walk around the city selling them. He would take a seat at a tea stand, and when someone sat beside him he would ask him to please take a copy of Back to Godhead. His writing was never shrill, strident, or fanatical, despite his desperate poverty and the urgency of his message. He wrote expecting to find his reader prepared to hear sound philosophy and willing to accept the truth, especially when presented logically, relevantly, and authoritatively.

·         While keeping up his effort of printing and selling Back to Godhead in Delhi, Abhay decided to take up residence in Vrindavana, a small holy town, 80 miles south of New Delhi. Abhay's idea was to write his essays in the peaceful, spiritual atmosphere of Vrindavana and commute to Delhi to distribute his literature and seek donations from respectable patrons. He took a simple, very inexpensive room in the Vamsi Gopalaji temple, located on the bank of the Yamuna River.

·         Sannyasa: One night Abhay had a striking dream, the same dream he had had several times before, during his days as a householder. Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati, his spiritual master appeared in his dream. He urged Abhay to take sannyasa. Later Abhay formally took sannyasa. Abbay's name became Abhay Caranaravinda Bhaktivedanta Swami. Yet his basic problems remained. He wanted to preach Krishna consciousness, but few were willing to listen.

·         The Momentous Hour of Need: Once a librarian advised him to write books as they were permanent, whereas newspapers and magazines were read once and thrown away. Bhaktivedanta Swami took it that his spiritual master was speaking through this person. Bhaktivedanta Swami considered Srimad-Bhagavatam, because it was the most important and authoritative Vaisnava scripture. He returned to Delhi with new purpose. Through an old printing contact, he met a temple owner who gave him a free room in his Radha-Krishna temple near Chandni Chowk. The neighbourhood was called Chippiwada, a congested, mixed Hindu-Muslim quarter. With new enthusiasm, he picked up a few donations and began again publishing Back to Godhead while at the same time beginning his translation and commentary of Srimad-Bhagavatam. At his room in the Chippiwada temple, he typed day and night at his desk beneath the small light that dangled on its cord from the ceiling. He sat on a thin mat on the floor, his typewriter before him on a trunk. Pages accumulated, and he kept them in place with stones. Food and sleep were only incidental. He was completely convinced that Srimad-Bhagavatam would create a revolution in a misdirected civilization. Thus he translated each word and wrote each purport with exacting care and concentration.

·         At Radha Damodara temple: Bhaktivedanta Swami later moved his Vrindavana residence to the Radha-Damodara temple. Now without even leaving his room, he could look out and see the altar and the four-foot-high form of Vrndavana-candra, the black marble Krishna Deity worshiped hundreds of years ago by Krsnadasa Kaviraja. While staying at the Radha-Damodara temple, Bhaktivedanta Swami would prepare his own meals. And  as he sat to take prasadam, he could see through the latticework the samadhi tomb of Rupa Gosvami. Feeling Rupa Gosvami's presence, he would think of his own mission for his spiritual master.

·         The Dream Come True: Once in Vrindavana, Bhaktivedanta Swami met Mr. Agarwal, a Mathura businessman, and mentioned to him in passing, as he did to almost everyone he met, that he wanted to go to the West. Although Mr. Agarwal had known Bhaktivedanta Swami for only a few minutes, he volunteered to try to get him a sponsor in America by asking his son Gopal, an engineer in Pennsylvania, to send back a sponsorship form. When Mr. Agarwal volunteered to help in this way, Bhaktivedanta Swami urged him to please do so. One day, to his surprise, he  was contacted by the Ministry of External Affairs and informed that his No Objection certificate for traveling to the U.S.A was ready. Since he had not instigated any proceedings for leaving the country, he had to inquire from the ministry about what had happened. They showed him the Statutory Declaration Form signed by Mr. Gopal Agarwal of Butler, Pennsylvania; Mr. Agarwal solemnly declared that he would bear the expenses of Bhaktivedanta Swami during his stay in the U.S.A.

·         Meeting with Sumati Morarji: Having obtained the passport and sponsorship  papers, Bhaktivedanta Swami went to Bombay to seek assistance in getting to America. He approached  Sumati Morarji, the head of the Scindia Steamship Line, who had helped him with a large donation for printing Volume Two of Srimad-Bhagavatam. He showed his sponsorship papers to her secretary, Mr. Choksi, who was impressed and went to Mrs. Morarji on his behalf. Mrs. Morarji said no, the Swamiji was too old to go to the United States and expect to accomplish anything. Mr. Choksi conveyed to him Mrs. Morarji's words, but Bhaktivedanta Swami listened disapprovingly. She wanted him to stay in India and complete Srimad-Bhagavatam. Why go to the United States? she had argued. Finish the job here. But Bhaktivedanta Swami was fixed on going. He told Mr. Choksi to convince Mrs. Morarji and even coached him on what to say. But when Mr. Choksi told Mrs. Morarji she again said no; the Swami was not healthy. Besides, people in America were not so cooperative, and they would probably not listen to him. Exasperated with Mr. Choksi's ineffectiveness, he demanded a personal interview. He presented his emphatic request: "Please give me one ticket ...” Sumati Morarji was concerned: "Swamiji. You are so old-you are taking this responsibility. Do you think it is all right?" "No," he reassured her, lifting his hand as if to reassure a doubting daughter. "It is all right... But do you know what my secretaries think? They say, ‘Swamiji is going to die there.’… " Bhaktivedanta Swami made a face as if to dismiss a foolish rumour. Again he insisted that she give him a ticket. "All right," she said. "Get your P-form, and I will make an arrangement to send you by our ship.” Bhaktivedanta Swami smiled brilliantly and happily left her office. Following Mrs. Morarji's instructions, the secretary made final arrangements. She scheduled a place for him on one of her ships, the Jaladuta, which was sailing from Calcutta on August 13. She had made certain that he would travel on a ship whose captain under stood the needs of a vegetarian and a brahmana, and she told the Jaladuta’s captain, Arun Pandia to carry extra vegetables and fruits for the Swami.

·         Jaladuta: On August 13, 1965, at the age of 69, he set off to the West to fulfil the mission of his spiritual master, begging free passage and boarding a cargo ship to New York. On the day of his departure on Jaladuta, he had only a suitcase, an umbrella, a supply of dry cereal, a Bengali copy of Caitanya-Caritamrta and just 7 dollars in Indian rupees. The journey proved to be treacherous. He suffered two heart attacks aboard ship. By August 23rd, the ship was travelling through Red Sea where he encountered great difficulty. He noted in his diary: "Rain, seasickness, dizziness, headache, no appetite, vomiting.” In two days he suffered two heart attacks. He tolerated the difficulty, meditating on the purpose of his mission, but after two days of such violent attacks he thought that if another were to come he would certainly not survive. On the night of the second day, he had a dream. Lord Krishna, in His many forms, was rowing a boat, and Lord told him that he should not fear. He felt assured of Lord Krishna's protection, and the violent attacks did not recur. After 35 days at sea he finally arrived at a lonely Brooklyn pier with just $7 dollars in Indian rupees and a crate of his translations of sacred Sanskrit texts. Arriving at Commonwealth Pier at Boston harbour, he wrote a poem, entitled "Markine Bhagavata-dharma" ("Teaching Krishna Consciousness in America").

·         In America: In New York he faced great hardships without money or a place to live. For the first year he struggled alone, booking speaking engagements at yoga studios, YMCAs, and bohemian artists' lofts, while living in the homes of people he met who sympathized with his cause and would give him temporary residence. He would often take a small bongo drum and sit under a tree in a public park to chant the holy names of Krishna. Curious onlookers would gather. Some joined in the chanting. Some began to take an active interest in his mission. He began his mission humbly, by giving classes on the Bhagavad-Gita in lofts on the Bowery, New York’s infamous skid row, and leading kirtan (traditional devotional chants) in Tompkins Square Park. His message of peace and goodwill resonated with many young people, some of whom came forward to become serious students of the Krishna-bhakti tradition. With the help of these students, Bhaktivedanta Swami rented a small storefront on New York’s Lower East Side to use as a temple. After a year of hardship and struggle, in July of 1966, Bhaktivedanta Swami established the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) for the purpose of checking the imbalance of values in the world and working for real unity and peace.

·         Spreading Krishna Consciousness Worldwide: He brought to the West the divine teachings of Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu who taught the public glorification of the Hare Krishna maha-mantra. Srila Prabhupada taught that every living being is an eternal servant of Lord Sri Krishna with a dormant natural propensity to experience the eternal bliss of pure love of God. He taught that each soul is part and parcel of the quality of God and that one could find true happiness through living a simpler, more natural way of life and dedicating one’s energy in the service of God.

·         Having begun initiating his American followers into the Gaudiya Vaishnava lineage, Bhaktivedanta Swami next traveled to San Francisco. Amidst the emerging hippie community in the Haight-Ashbury district, during 1967’s “Summer of Love” he taught that the experience of devotion through kirtan was a spiritual “high” superior to any pleasures derived from material sources such as wealth, fame, or intoxication. In the following months many more came forward to assist him. Desiring to address him with the respect due a revered spiritual teacher, his disciples began to call him Srila Prabhupada, meaning “one at whose feet the masters sit”. In 1967, the first Rathayatra festival outside of India was held in San Francisco. Rathayatra is one of the oldest and largest annual religious festivals in the world, performed each year in the holy city of Jagannatha Puri on the East Coast of India. Several million people line the streets to pull giant 3-story chariots carrying deity forms of Lord Krishna through the streets, accompanied by festive chanting of His names. Today Lord Jagannatha Rathayatra is organized in many major cities and towns in more than 165 countries.

·         From 1969 to 1973, temples opened in Europe, Canada, South America, Mexico, Africa, Australia and India. From 1970 to 1977, ISKCON built major centres at the holy pilgrimage sites of Mayapur and Vrindavana, India, and a large temple in Mumbai. In 1972, Srila Prabhupada founded the publishing house Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (BBT), now the world’s foremost publisher of books on Krishna consciousness, or bhakti-yoga. From 1966 through 1977, Srila Prabhupada translated more than 40 volumes of the great classics of Krishna conscious literature from Sanskrit into English, giving elaborate commentaries synthesizing the realizations of previous masters along with his own. These books include Bhagavad-Gita As It Is, the definitive presentation of Lord Krishna's teachings, Srimad-Bhagavatam (Bhagavata Purana), the 18-volume history of Lord Krishna's incarnations, pastimes and devotees, and Sri Caitanya-Caritamrta, the 9-volume biography and teachings of Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu. These books have been published by the BBT in more than 50 languages, with several million copies sold and distributed by members of ISKCON to people all over the world. Since 1974, ISKCON Food for Life has run karma-free vegetarian food relief programs in disaster areas and cities around the world.

·         In the 11 years (1966-1977), Srila Prabhupada circled the globe fourteen times, bringing the teachings of Bhakti to thousands of people on six continents. Men and women from all backgrounds came forward to accept his message. With their help, Srila Prabhupada established centers and projects throughout the world including temples, rural communities, educational institutions, and what would become the world’s largest vegetarian food relief program.

 

Srila Prabhupada's Books: Srila Prabhupada's most significant contribution are his books. Highly respected by the academic community for their authority, depth and clarity, they are used as standard textbooks in numerous college courses. By 1977 when Srila Prabhupada left this world in Vrindavana he had completed over 70 volumes of authoritative translations and commentaries including the Bhagavad-Gita As It Is, Srimad-Bhagavatam, Caitanya Caritamrta and Sri Isopanisad. His writings have been translated into over 50 languages. His writings constitute a veritable library of Vedic philosophy, religion, literature and culture. The Bhaktivedanta Vedabase has been created so that this great reservoir of knowledge may be preserved and propagated and so that all may take advantage of the wisdom and association of the pure devotee of Lord Sri Krishna.

 

For millennia the teachings of Bhakti-yoga had been concealed within Sanskrit and Indian vernacular languages, and the rich culture of Bhakti had been hidden behind the borders of India. Today, millions around the globe express their gratitude to Srila Prabhupada for revealing the timeless wisdom of Bhakti to a world immersed in a materialistic and self-destructive ethos. Just as the sun is known by many names in different parts of the world, “ISKCON,” “Krishna consciousness,” and “Krishna” Himself are non-sectarian and non-denominational terms which refer to the worship of God, the Supreme Person. Anyone, anywhere can practice Krishna consciousness and become a “fan” or member of ISKCON. One do not need to change their religion to adopt the practices of Krishna consciousness. As such, it transcends the limitations of temporary material bodies and their associated designations.

 

His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada is considered as world’s foremost spiritual ambassador. It is through his standard of purity, unprecedented dedication and genuineness that has instilled the hearts of many millions throughout the world with Krishna-Bhakti. He passed away on November 14, 1977, in the holy town of Vrindavana, surrounded by his loving disciples who carry on his mission today. Though no longer physically present among us, Srila Prabhupada lives forever in his books, and in the hearts of those whose lives he touched.

[References: Srila Prabhupada-līlamta and other resources by Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (BBT).]

 

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His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada (1896-1977) was sent by the Lord Krishna to fulfil Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu's prediction “Prtvithe ache yata nagaradi grama, sarvatra pracara haibe more nama” - In every town and village of the world, My name will be heard. Srila Prabhupada is widely regarded as the world’s pre-eminent exponent of the teachings and practices of Bhakti-yoga to the Western world. He is a Gaudiya Vaishnava spiritual teacher and the Founder-acarya of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), commonly known as the "Hare Krishna Movement”.

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He appeared as Abhay Charan De on Sep 1, in 1896, in Calcutta. His father was Gour Mohan De, a cloth merchant, and his mother was Rajani. Gour Mohan was a pure Vaisnava, and he raised his son to be Krishna conscious. Gour Mohan wanted Vaisnava goals for his son; he wanted Abbay to become a servant of Sri Sri Radha and Krishna, to become a preacher of the Bhagavatam and to learn the devotional art of playing the mrdanga drum. He regularly received sadhus in his home, and he would always ask them, "Please bless my son that Srimati Radharani will grant him Her blessings." Abbay was also enamoured with the Rathayatra festival of Lord Jagannatha. With the help of his father, he built a Rathayatra cart and had Rathayatra festival with his friends.

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In 1922 Abhay had the first meeting with his spiritual master, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, a prominent religious scholar and the founder of 64 Gaudiya Mathas (Vedic institutes). At first Abbay didn't want to meet him, having been unimpressed by the so-called sadhus who used to visit his father's house. But a friend of Abhay's had insisted, escorting him to the quarters of the Gaudiya Math, where they were brought him in the presence of Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati. No sooner did Abbay and his friend respectfully bow before the saintly person and prepare to sit than he said to them, "You are educated young men. Why don't you preach Lord Caitanya's message throughout the whole world?" Abbay was very surprised that the sadhu had immediately asked them to become preachers on his behalf. Impressed by Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati, he wanted to test him with intelligent inquiries. Abbay proclaimed one to be a supporter of Gandhi's cause for political emancipation. In the spirit of Indian nationalism, therefore, Abbay inquired, "Who will hear your Caitanya's message? We are a dependent country. First India must become independent. How can we spread India's culture if we are under British rule?"

House in Ulta Danga in Kolkata where Srila Prabhupada first met Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura. It is situated at 60/14 Gouri Bari Lane, Kolkata 700004.

Srila Bhaktisiddhanta replied that Krishna consciousness didn't have to wait for a change in Indian politics, nor was it dependent on who ruled. Krishna consciousness was so important that it could not wait. All governments were temporary; the eternal reality was Krishna consciousness, and the real self was the spirit soul. No man-made political system could help humanity. This was the verdict of the Vedic scriptures and the line of spiritual masters.

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Real public welfare work, he said, should go beyond concerns of the temporary and prepare a person for his next life and his eternal relationship with the Supreme. Abhay concluded that this was certainly not dubious sadhu. He listened attentively to the arguments become convinced. That very night he had actually accepted Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati as his spiritual master. "Not officially," Prabhupada said, "but in my heart. I was thinking that I had met a very nice saintly person."

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In 1932, Abhay received initiation from Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura. Abhay's family responsibilities and his preaching, however, seemed to conflict. His wife was religious at home, but didn't like the idea to spread Krishna consciousness. When Abbay attempted to hold gatherings in their home and speak from Bhagavad-Gita, she preferred to stay upstairs drinking tea. Still, despite her obstinacy, Abbay remained patient and tried to include her.

In 1940s large national and international events continued including World War II and in 1947 India gained independence. But the national happiness was soon followed by horror as hundreds of thousands died in the fighting that followed the partition of the nation into India and Pakistan. Abbay was not hopeful about promises for peace, nor did he consider Indian independence the solution. Unless the leaders were God conscious, what change would there be? In Back to Godhead, in his article "Gandhi-Jinnah Talks," he wrote, "Fighting will go on between Hindu and Mohammedan, between Christians and Christians, between Buddhist and Buddhist till the day of annihilation." His point: “As long as people are possessed of selfish interests and desires for sense gratification, they will continue fighting. Real unity was possible only on the platform of spiritual understanding and service to the Supreme.” Recognizing Abhay’s philosophical learning and devotion, the Gaudiya Vaisnava Society honored him in 1947 with the title "Bhaktivedanta."

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Struggling alone

With great difficulty, even when Abbay was unable to raise enough money to publish regular issues of Back to Godhead magazine, he continued writing. Presenting himself as a humble servant, he would explain his ideas on how to apply India's original Krishna conscious culture as the successful solution to all manner of dilemmas.

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New Delhi - Crying Alone in Wilderness

The 1950s proved very difficult years for Abbay. In Delhi he spent his time writing and approaching donors, to whom he preached Bhagavad-Gita. He was calling on wealthy men, presenting his manuscripts and explaining his mission. But few responded. Lacking money to buy even proper clothes, Abbay went through the chilly Delhi winter without a jacket. He would regularly walk to the printer's to read the proofs of Back to Godhead. When the printer asked him why he was intent on producing his newspaper under such hardships, he replied, "It is my mission." He managed to pay the printer small amounts at intervals. After picking up the copies from the printer, Abhay would walk around the city selling them. He would take a seat at a tea stand, and when someone sat beside him he would ask him to please take a copy of Back to Godhead.

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Srila Prabhupada at Jhansi in 1954

Once a hospital customer in the city of Jhansi invited Abbay to lecture at the Gita Mandir. His lecture was well received. Leaving his Allahabad business affairs in the hands of his son, he tried to create a spiritual movement in Jhansi. Abbay was 56, and he thought that he must now begin very seriously manifesting the orders of his spiritual master. In 1954 he wrote a charter and legally registered his movement as the "League of Devotees": "Wanted-candidates from any nationality to qualify themselves as real Brahmins for preaching the teachings of Bhagwat Geeta for all practical purposes throughout the whole world. Deserving candidates will be provided with free boarding and lodging. Apply: A.C. Bhaktivedanta, Founder and Secretary of the League of Devotees, Bharati Bhawan, P.O. Jhansi (U.P.)" -Abhay Charan De. At Jhansi he had to leave his building when the governor's wife insisted that it be used for a ladies' club instead of the League of Devotees. Without a place to stay and with no real support, he left Jhansi to Delhi.

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Accepting sannyasa

One night Abhay had a striking dream, the same dream he had had several times before, during his days as a householder. Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati, his spiritual master appeared in his dream. He urged Abhay to take sannyasa. Later Abhay formally took sannyasa. Abbay's name became Abhay Caranaravinda Bhaktivedanta Swami.

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Chippiwada temple near Chandni Chowk, Old Delhi

Once a librarian advised him to write books as they were permanent. Bhaktivedanta Swami took it that his spiritual master was speaking through this person. Bhaktivedanta Swami considered Srimad-Bhagavatam. He returned to Delhi with new purpose. He got a free room in a Radha-Krishna temple near Chandni Chowk. The neighbourhood was called Chippiwada, a congested, mixed Hindu-Muslim quarter. With new enthusiasm, he picked up a few donations and began again publishing Back to Godhead while at the same time beginning his translation and commentary of Srimad-Bhagavatam. At his room in the Chippiwada temple, he typed day and night at his desk beneath the small light that dangled on its cord from the ceiling. He sat on a thin mat on the floor, his typewriter before him on a trunk. Pages accumulated, and he kept them in place with stones. Food and sleep were only incidental. He was completely convinced that Srimad-Bhagavatam would create a revolution in a misdirected civilization. Thus he translated each word and wrote each purport with exacting care and concentration.

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Srila Prabhupada with Lal Bahadur Shastri

In addition to selling Back to Godhead at tea stalls and deliver­ing copies to donors, Abhay also mailed out free copies-both within India and abroad. For years, the vast audience of English­ speaking readers outside India had concerned him, and he wanted to reach them. Having gathered addresses of libraries, universities, and cultural and government outlets outside India, he mailed as many Back to Godheads as he could afford. He prepared a letter for his Western readers, suggesting that they should be even more receptive than his countrymen.

On the home front, Abhay sent copies of Back to Godhead to the president of India, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, along with a letter warning him of the perilous fate that awaits a society conducted by the godless-"Please therefore save them from the great fall­ down." He requested His Excellency at least to glance over the headlines of the enclosed copies of Back to Godhead and to consider granting the editor an interview. "I am crying alone in the wilderness at the present moment," wrote Abhay. His Excellency never replied. Once he got opportunity to meet Prime Minister, Lal Bahadur Shastri. Srila Prabhupada handed a copy of Volume One of Srimad-Bhagavatam. The next day, he wrote to Prime Minister Shastri. Soon he received a reply: “Dear Swamiji, I am indeed grateful to you for presenting a copy of Srimad Bhagwa­tam to me. I do realise that you are doing valuable work. It would be good idea if the libraries in the Government Insti­tutions purchase copies of this book.”

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Sri Sri Radha-Damodara Temple at Sri Vrindavana Dhama

While keeping up his effort of printing and selling Back to Godhead in Delhi, Abhay decided to take up residence in Vrindavana, a small holy town, 80 miles south of New Delhi. Abhay's idea was to write his essays in the peaceful, spiritual atmosphere of Vrindavana and commute to Delhi to distribute his literature and seek donations from respectable patrons. He took a simple, very inexpensive room in the Vamsi Gopalaji temple, located on the bank of the Yamuna River.

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Srila Prabhupada at Sri Sri Radha-Damodara temple in Vrindavana

Bhaktivedanta Swami later moved his Vrindavana residence to the Radha-Damodara temple. Once in Vrindavana, Bhaktivedanta Swami met Mr. Agarwal, a Mathura businessman, and mentioned to him in passing, as he did to almost everyone he met, that he wanted to go to the West. Although Mr. Agarwal had known Bhaktivedanta Swami for only a few minutes, he volunteered to try to get him a sponsor in America by asking his son Gopal, in Pennsylvania, to send back a sponsorship form. One day, to his surprise, he  was contacted by the Ministry of External Affairs and informed that his No Objection certificate for traveling to the U.S.A was ready.

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Srila Prabhupada with Sumati Morarji, the head of the Scindia Steamship Line

Having obtained the passport and sponsorship  papers, Bhaktivedanta Swami went to Bombay to seek assistance in getting to America. He approached  Sumati Morarji, the head of the Scindia Steamship Line, who had helped him with a large donation for printing Volume Two of Srimad-Bhagavatam. He showed his sponsorship papers to her secretary, Mr. Choksi, who was impressed and went to Mrs. Morarji on his behalf. Mrs. Morarji said no, the Swamiji was too old to go to the United States and expect to accomplish anything. Mr. Choksi conveyed to him Mrs. Morarji's words, but Bhaktivedanta Swami listened disapprovingly. She wanted him to stay in India and complete Srimad-Bhagavatam. Why go to the United States? she had argued. Finish the job here. But Bhaktivedanta Swami was fixed on going. He told Mr. Choksi to convince Mrs. Morarji and even coached him on what to say. But when Mr. Choksi told Mrs. Morarji she again said no; the Swami was not healthy. Besides, people in America were not so cooperative, and they would probably not listen to him. Exasperated with Mr. Choksi's ineffectiveness, he demanded a personal interview. He presented his emphatic request: "Please give me one ticket ...” Sumati Morarji was concerned: "Swamiji. You are so old-you are taking this responsibility. Do you think it is all right?" "No," he reassured her, lifting his hand as if to reassure a doubting daughter. "It is all right... But do you know what my secretaries think? They say, ‘Swamiji is going to die there.’… " He made a face as if to dismiss a foolish rumour. Again he insisted that she give him a ticket. "All right," she said. "Get your P-form, and I will make an arrangement to send you by our ship.” Bhaktivedanta Swami smiled brilliantly and happily left her office.

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Jaladuta

In 1965, at the age of 69, he set off to the West to fulfil the mission of his spiritual master, begging free passage and boarding a cargo ship to New York. On the day of his departure on Jaladuta, he had only a suitcase, an umbrella, a supply of dry cereal, a Bengali copy of Caitanya-Caritamrta and just 7 dollars in Indian rupees.

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Lord Krishna came in dream after Srila Prabhupada suffered two heart attacks aboard ship

The journey proved to be treacherous. He suffered two heart attacks aboard ship. By August 23rd, the ship was travelling through Red Sea where he encountered great difficulty. He noted in his diary: "Rain, seasickness, dizziness, headache, no appetite, vomiting.” In two days he suffered two heart attacks. He tolerated the difficulty, meditating on the purpose of his mission, but after two days of such violent attacks he thought that if another were to come he would certainly not survive. On the night of the second day, he had a dream. Lord Krishna, in His many forms, was rowing a boat, and Lord told him that he should not fear. He felt assured of Lord Krishna's protection, and the violent attacks did not recur. After 35 days at sea he finally arrived at a lonely Brooklyn pier with just $7 dollars in Indian rupees and a crate of his translations of sacred Sanskrit texts. Arriving at Commonwealth Pier at Boston harbour, he wrote a poem, entitled "Markine Bhagavata-dharma".

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Srila Prabhupada’s passport

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Matchless Gifts storefront at 26 Second Avenue, New York - The Seed of Hare Krishna Movement in the West

In New York he faced great hardships without money or a place to live. For the first year he struggled alone, booking speaking engagements at yoga studios, YMCAs, and bohemian artists' lofts. He began his mission humbly, by giving classes on the Bhagavad-Gita in lofts on the Bowery, New York’s infamous skid row, and leading kirtan (traditional devotional chants) in Tompkins Square Park.

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Srila Prabhupada chanting Hare Krishna at Tompkins Square Park in New York

His message of peace and goodwill resonated with many young people, some of whom came forward to become serious students of the Krishna-bhakti tradition. With the help of these students, Bhaktivedanta Swami rented a small storefront on New York’s Lower East Side to use as a temple.

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Hare Krishna Tree at Tompkins Square Park in New York

A leaflet went on to extol Krishna Consciousness:

STAY HIGH FOREVER!

No more coming down.

Practice Krishna Consciousness

Expand your consciousness by practicing the

*Transcendental Sound Vibration*

Hare Krishna Hare Krishna Krishna Krishna Hare Hare

Hare Rama Hare Rama Rama Rama Hare Hare

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After a year of hardship and struggle, in July of 1966, Bhaktivedanta Swami established the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) for the purpose of checking the imbalance of values in the world and working for real unity and peace.

A friend had suggested naming society as ‘God Consciousness’ instead of Krishna Consciousness. Srila Prabhupada replied sternly, “God has a name - Krishna. So, why not use it?” Srila Prabhupada said, "God" was a vague term, whereas "Krishna" was exact and scientific; "God consciousness" was spiritually weaker, less personal. And if Westerners didn't know that Krishna was God, then the International Society for Krishna Consciousness would tell them, by spreading His glories "in every town and village."

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Srila Prabhupada chanting at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco

Guided by Srila Prabhupada, two couples among his disciples opened a Hare Krishna temple in San Francisco. After Matchless Gifts in New York, that was the second ISKCON temple.

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1967: “Summer of Love”

All the cutting-edge San Francisco bands (The Grateful Dead, Moby Grape, Janis Joplin, Big Brother and the Holding Company, etc.) had agreed to appear with Srila Prabhupada at the Avalon Ballroom’s Mantra-Rock Dance, proceeds from which went to the newly opened local Hare Krishna temple. Thousands of jubilant hippies packed the hall.

During 1967’s “Summer of Love” he taught that the experience of devotion through kirtan was a spiritual “high” superior to any pleasures derived from material sources such as wealth, fame, or intoxication.

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He brought to the West the divine teachings of Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu who taught the public glorification of the Hare Krishna maha-mantra.

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Srila Prabhupada taught that every living being is an eternal servant of Lord Sri Krishna with a dormant natural propensity to experience the eternal bliss of pure love of God. He taught that each soul is part and parcel of the quality of God and that one could find true happiness through living a simpler, more natural way of life and dedicating one’s energy in the service of God.

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In 1967, the first Rathayatra festival outside of India was held in San Francisco. Rathayatra is one of the oldest and largest annual religious festivals in the world, performed each year in the holy city of Jagannatha Puri in India. Several million people line the streets to pull giant 3-story chariots carrying deity forms of Lord Krishna through the streets, accompanied by festive chanting of His names. Today Lord Jagannatha Rathayatra is organized in many major cities and towns in more than 165 countries.

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Srila Prabhupada with George Harrison

He began initiating his American followers into the Gaudiya Vaishnava lineage. In the following months many more came forward to assist him. Desiring to address him with the respect due a revered spiritual teacher, his disciples began to call him Srila Prabhupada, meaning “one at whose feet the masters sit”.

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From 1969 to 1973, temples opened in Europe, Canada, South America, Mexico, Africa, Australia and India.

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Srila Prabhupada at the TV interview in San Francisco, 1975

In 1972, Srila Prabhupada founded the publishing house Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (BBT), now the world’s foremost publisher of books on Krishna consciousness, or bhakti-yoga.

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From 1966 through 1977, Srila Prabhupada translated more than 40 volumes of the great classics of Krishna conscious literature from Sanskrit into English, giving elaborate commentaries synthesizing the realizations of previous masters along with his own. These books include Bhagavad-Gita As It Is, the definitive presentation of Lord Krishna's teachings, Srimad-Bhagavatam (Bhagavata Purana), the 18-volume history of Lord Krishna's incarnations, pastimes and devotees, and Sri Caitanya-Caritamrta, the 9-volume biography and teachings of Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu. These books have been published by the BBT in more than 50 languages, with several million copies sold and distributed by members of ISKCON to people all over the world.

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In the 11 years (1966-1977), Srila Prabhupada circled the globe fourteen times, bringing the teachings of Bhakti to thousands of people on six continents.

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Men and women from all backgrounds came forward to accept his message. With their help, Srila Prabhupada established centers and projects throughout the world including temples, rural communities, educational institutions, and what would become the world’s largest vegetarian food relief program.

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George Harrison chanting Hare Krishna

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Srila Prabhupada

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Srila Prabhupada

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Srila Prabhupada

Srila Prabhupada in Moscow

Srila Prabhupada could visit former Soviet Union for 5 days in 1971. During his visit he met a young Russian boy who later became his first and only initiated disciple from the Soviet Union, Ananda Shanti. This Russian boy single-handedly started preaching the eternal message of Bhagavad-Gita, and in this way the teachings of Srila Prabhupada became known to the hundreds and thousands of Soviet people, so much so that in the beginning of the 1980's the KGB declared ISKCON one of the greatest threats to the Soviet nation. In this way, the war was declared - the war of the totalitarian state against the handful of first devotees of Krishna in Soviet Russia. The KGB started massive persecution campaigns against the first followers of ISKCON. Around a hundred of the first Russian devotees were thrown into prisons, labor camps and psychiatric hospitals. They underwent tremendous sufferings and tortures, but kept their strong, unflinching faith in Lord Krishna and His words in Bhagavad-Gita. One of them, Sarkis Ohanjanyan was only 21 when he was put in prison. His only "guilt" was that he believed in God, chanted the Hare Krishna maha-mantra and refused to eat meat. One and a half years later he died in the winter of 1986 in a labor camp out of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Before departure he was chanting on the beads made from the prison bread, and had applied tilaka on his body with the toothpaste. Olga Kiselyova was put in prison in 1983 when she was pregnant. Her "crime" was that she helped in translating the Bhagavad-Gita into the Russian language. After undergoing tortures and long, arduous interrogations she delivered a baby girl Marika in prison who died only two months later. The Hare Krishna devotees around the world started a campaign of protest against persecution in the USSR. As a result, in 1988 all Soviet Hare Krishna devotees were released by Mr. M. Gorbachev and the new era of religious freedom in Russia had begun. In 1989, the Hare Krishna movement came out from the underground in the Soviet Union, as glasnost brought an end to persecution. By 1991, more than one million copies of Srila Prabhupada’s Bhagavad-Gita As It Is had been sold in the former Soviet Union.

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Srila Prabhupada

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From 1970 to 1977, ISKCON built major centres at the holy pilgrimage sites of Mayapur and Vrindavana, India, and a large temple in Mumbai.

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Srila Prabhupada's most significant contribution are his books.

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Highly respected by the academic community for their authority, depth and clarity, they are used as standard textbooks in numerous college courses. By 1977 when Srila Prabhupada left this world in Vrindavana he had completed over 70 volumes of authoritative translations and commentaries including the Bhagavad-Gita As It Is, Srimad-Bhagavatam, Caitanya Caritamrta and Sri Isopanisad.

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His writings have been translated into over 50 languages. His writings constitute a veritable library of Vedic philosophy, religion, literature and culture.

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The Bhaktivedanta Vedabase has been created so that this great reservoir of knowledge may be preserved and propagated and so that all may take advantage of the wisdom and association of the pure devotee of Lord Sri Krishna.

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Srila Prabhupada created the world's first chain of vegetarian restaurants.

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He set up farm communities to teach "simple living and high thinking", emphasizing cow protection and dependence on God and nature.

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In 1972 Srila Prabhupada introduced the Vedic system of primary and secondary education in the West by founding the gurukula school in Dallas.

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Take advantage of this rare opportunity of this human form of life. There are 8,400,000 different species of life through which we are rotating life after life. So getting a human body is not an everyday affair. This most auspicious opportunity only comes after many millions of lifetimes in the lower species.

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Anyone who does not utilize their human life for self-realization is making the greatest mistake. When this happens it is the greatest tragedy, and unfortunately today this neglect of the human form has become the standard behaviour for the entire human society.” A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

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Srila Prabhupada offering the first arati ceremony at Sri Sri Krishna Balarama Temple in Vrindavana

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Srila Prabhupada’s Samadhi memorial at Sri Sri Krishna Balarama Temple in Vrindavana

He passed away on November 14, 1977, in the holy town of Vrindavana, surrounded by his loving disciples who carry on his mission today.

Fifty Years of Achievements

The number of ISKCON centres, temples, schools and colleges worldwide: 650

The number of books and magazines published by the Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (BBT) and distributed worldwide since 1966: 516 million

The number of Hare Krishna vegetarian restaurants worldwide: 110

Since 1966, around 95,000 devotees have taken formal spiritual initiation (clerical vows).

It is estimated that more than 9 million people worship at ISKCON temples each year.

There are 3600 home study/worship (Bhakti Vriksha) groups worldwide that meet weekly.

Fifty Years of Achievements

More than 3 billion meals of sanctified vegetarian food (prasadam) have been distributed globally since 1966.

1.2 million meals of sanctified vegetarian food (prasadam) are served daily to children in India as part of the ISKCON Food Relief Foundation’s ‘Midday Meal’ or ‘Annamrita’ program.

There are 65 ISKCON farms/eco villages globally.

There are more than 6000 Krishna festivals held around the world every year in ISKCON.

Bhaktivedanta Hospital in Mumbai, India, one of the nine ISKCON affiliated hospitals, medical clinics, eye clinics, and hospices in India, treated 212,992 patients last year.

Padayatra teams have walked 269,000km (161,000 miles), worldwide visiting 52,000 towns and villages in 110 countries.

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For millennia the teachings of Bhakti-yoga had been concealed within Sanskrit and Indian vernacular languages, and the rich culture of Bhakti had been hidden behind the borders of India.

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ISKCON Farms

Today, millions around the globe express their gratitude to Srila Prabhupada for revealing the timeless wisdom of Bhakti to a world immersed in a materialistic and self-destructive ethos.

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Cow protection and ISKCON’s Daiva Varnasrama

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ISKCON’s Food for Life (FFL) program

Since 1974, ISKCON Food for Life has run karma-free vegetarian food relief programs in disaster areas and cities around the world.

Food for Life (FFL) program

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ISKCON Padayatra

Padayatra teams have walked 269,000km (161,000 miles), worldwide visiting 52,000 towns and villages in 110 countries, since its inception in 1976.

Padayatra is a Sanskrit word meaning ‘festival or pilgrimage on foot’. Srila Prabhupada introduced the first ISKCON Padayatra with bullock carts in 1976, in India. Many more followed on all continents, lasting a few days to several years. A Padayatra’s purpose is to spread the holy names of God, distribute spiritual literature, promote simple living, high thinking and cow protection, hold cultural festivals and make friends with al kinds of people at the grassroots level. One hundred and fifty Padayatra teams, with approx. 10,000 participants, have walked 269,000km (161,000 miles). This is almost 6.5 times the Earth’s circumference. Padayatra Worldwide has visited 52,000 towns and villages in 110 countries since its inception in 1976.

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ISKCON Parikrama’s (holy pilgrimages)

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Holy pilgrimages to Sri Vrindavana, Sri Mayapur, Jagannatha Puri, Dwarka, South India and others holy places across India.

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ISKCON Festivals

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ISKCON Festivals

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ISKCON Festivals

ISKCON Festivals

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ISKCON Festivals

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ISKCON Festivals

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Just as the sun is known by many names in different parts of the world, “ISKCON,” “Krishna consciousness,” and “Krishna” Himself are non-sectarian and non-denominational terms which refer to the worship of God, the Supreme Person.

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Anyone, anywhere can practice Krishna consciousness and become a “fan” or member of ISKCON. One do not need to change their religion to adopt the practices of Krishna consciousness. As such, it transcends the limitations of temporary material bodies and their associated designations.

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His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada is considered as world’s foremost spiritual ambassador.

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It is through his standard of purity, unprecedented dedication and genuineness that has instilled the hearts of many millions throughout the world with Krishna-Bhakti.

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Though no longer physically present among us, Srila Prabhupada lives forever in his books, and in the hearts of those whose lives he touched.

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His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

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Lotus Feet of His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

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Srila Prabhupada Lilamrta

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“What is the Difficulty” book by Srutakirti Dasa

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“A Transcendental Diary” book by Hari Sauri Dasa

“Miracle on Second Avenue” book by His Holiness Mukunda Goswami

 

Books by His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada:

·         Bhagavad-Gita As It Is

·         Srimad-Bhagavatam, cantos 1-10, (29 vols.)

·         Sri Caitanya-Caritamrta (17 vols.)

·         Teachings of Lord Caitanya

·         The Nectar of Devotion

·         Sri Isopanisad

·         Easy Journey to Other Planets

·         Krishna Consciousness: The Topmost Yoga System

·         Krishna, the Supreme Personality of Godhead (3 vols.)

·         Perfect Questions, Perfect Answers

·         Dialectical Spiritualism - A Vedic View of Western Philosophy

·         Teachings of Lord Kapila, the Son of Devahuti

·         Transcendental Teachings of Prahlad Maharaja

·         Teachings of Queen Kunti

·         Krishna, the Reservoir of Pleasure

·         The Science of Self-Realization

·         The Path of Perfection

·         Life Comes From Life

·         The Perfection of Yoga

·         Beyond Birth and Death

·         On the Way to Krishna

·         Raja-vidya: The King of Knowledge

·         Elevation to Krishna Consciousness

·         Krishna Consciousness: The Matchless Gift

 

Srila Prabhupada Books Online:

Bhaktivedanta Vedabase: http://vedabase.com  

E-Vedas Library (books downloadable in PDF with Sanskrit verses): http://www.e-vedas.com/elib.htm

 

Srila Prabhupada’s lectures and bhajans: http://audio.iskcondesiretree.info/index.php?q=f&f=%2F01_-_His_Divine_Grace_A_C_Bhaktivedanta_Swami_Srila_Prabhupada

 

Complete Srila Prabhupada DVD Library (19 DVD’s): http://store.krishna.com/Detail.bok?no=4942&bar=_shp_sp

 

Srila Prabhupada-lilamrta: www.vedabase.com/en/spl

 

“What is the Difficulty” book by Srutakirti Das: www.vedabase.com/en/spu

 

Your Ever Well-wisher - Life and works of Srila Prabhupada: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PL3mtxwuJqZM1xh2KeNgplffD8PkZ13ywF&t=66&v=M_igqDqB7sk (video)

Srila Prabhupada Holy Tirthas in Kolkata: www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWLm9hx7NUU (video)

 

All about Krishna: www.Krishna.com /  www.iskcondesiretree.com

 

Mayapur TV: http://Mayapur.tv   /   Vrindavana TV: http://Vrindavana.tv/

 

Holy Pilgrimages: www.Holy-Pilgrimages.com

Holy Dham: www.HolyDham.com  

 

All glories to Om Visnu-pada Paramahamsa Parivrajakacarya Astotarra-sata

Sri Srimad His Divine Grace A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada!

 

HARE KRISHNA HARE KRISHNA KRISHNA KRISHNA HARE HARE |

HARE RAMA HARE RAMA RAMA RAMA HARE HARE ||